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CHAPTER 1PRINCE ALBERT I POLAR EXPLORATIONS 

CHAPTER 1 - PART 1A NAVIGATOR PRINCE WITH A PASSION FOR THE OCEAN

As early as 1884, Prince Albert I of Monaco organised scientific expeditions. His goal was to study and map the oceans, and his vessels were equipped with laboratories designed specifically for research. 

CHAPTER 1 - PART 2A SCHOLAR PRINCE, BEHIND MANY DISCOVERIES

During his expeditions, Prince Albert I discovered a new species of deep-sea fish: the Grimaldichthys profundissimus.  He also contributed to the study and discovery of the Arctic Ocean by exploring the lands to the north of Norway in 1898 and 1899, and then in 1906 and 1907. It was during these last three expeditions that he led several exploration missions, notably Scottish and Norwegian, which became the first to map several areas of north-west Spitsbergen.

CHAPTER 1 - PART 3A DESIRE TO SHARE AND COMMUNICATE

Prince Albert I of Monaco’s legacy includes, among other things, a scientific element. Among the great achievements of his life, the oceanographic Museum of Monaco occupies a special place. Officially opened in 1910, it is universally recognised as being one of the leading global institutions for research and education.

“Here, sirs, you can see that the land of Monaco has raised up a proud and inviolable temple to the new divinity which reigns over great intellects.”
Albert I during the official opening of the Monaco Oceanographic Museum Museum on 29 March 1910

CHAPTER 2SPITSBERGEN, A BARELY EXPLORED LAND

CHAPTER 2 - PART 1LAST STOP BEFORE THE NORTH POLE

The land closest to the island of Spitsbergen is Greenland, 447 kilometres away, while the northern tip of mainland Norway (Svalbard is also part of Norway) is 660 kilometres away.  The Svalbard archipelago, which includes Spitsbergen, is situated at a latitude of between 74° and 81° north in the Arctic Ocean. It is one of the last lands before the North pole. The terrain is mountainous and extremely rugged, since the landforms are recent and are being constantly eroded by ice sheets. Here, the polar night and the midnight sun last for four months. 

CHAPTER 2 - PART 2POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS WILDLIFE

The local plant and animal life has adapted to the extreme conditions of the Arctic lands. Svalbard, two thirds of which are classified as a “national park”, is a special nesting site for many seabirds. Reindeer, Arctic foxes and marine mammals are also found here, and Svalbard has the highest concentration of polar bears on the planet.

“Apart from the temperatures, what I fear the most on this trek are the crevasses. To a lesser extent, I also have some concerns about the polar bears. It's an animal I like very much, but I would rather not meet one!” 
Xavier Chevrin Eco-explorer Venturi
StartingpointFinishingpointMount Princess AliceMount GrimaldiMount Prince Albert IMonaco Glacier

CHAPTER 2 - PART 3GEOGRAPHY THAT BEARS THE MARK OF MONACO 

Several bays in north-west Spitsbergen (Red Bay, Cross Bay, and Hamburger Bay) were surveyed and mapped by Prince Albert I during his Arctic expeditions. The Prince named several points that could be seen from the sea: the Monaco Glacier, and the Princess Alice, Grimaldi and Albert I mountains. Northern Foreland on Magdalena Bay would be mapped in 1906 and 1907 by the Norwegian Isachsen mission, while the island of Prins Karl Forland would be mapped by the Scottish Bruce mission, both of which were directed and supported by the Prince.

CHAPTER 3AN EXTREME TREK IN TRIBUTE TO THE MONEGASQUE SPIRIT OF DISCOVERY

CHAPTER 3 - PART 1PUSHING BOUNDARIES

With its Global Challenges, Venturi is pushing the boundaries of what is possible.  During Mission No. 7: Spitsbergen, our very own eco-explorer Xavier Chevrin will ski 220 kilometres across the north of Spitsbergen, an island in the Svalbard archipelago.  Crossing some of the valleys of this region where no human has set foot before, Xavier will attempt, in 25 days, to reach each of the four points named by Prince Albert I during his mapping expeditions from the sea.

CHAPTER 3 - PART 2VENTURI IS KEEPING THE MONEGASQUE SPIRIT OF DISCOVERY AND INNOVATION ALIVE

Just like H.S.H. Prince Albert II and Prince Albert I of Monaco, Venturi President Gildo Pastor has a real passion for eco-friendly adventures, environmental protection and teamwork. It is therefore no surprise that the Venturi Group has decided to honour the memory of prince Albert I by taking on this major new challenge.

“Since 2010, Xavier Chevrin has been testing our electric motors with journeys by vehicle all over the world. He’s no stranger to extreme situations, and is therefore the man for the job when it comes to braving the cold, wind and ice for three weeks, over 220 kilometres on skis. The entire Venturi team is honoured to be able to pay tribute to Prince Albert I with this incredible adventure.”
Gildo Pastor President of Venturi Group

Acknowledgments

Venturi would like to thank everyone involved in this mission. This tribute to Prince Albert I would simply not have been possible without their invaluable contributions.